Mycroft Masada is a faith leader who moved to the Washington DC area from hir lifelong home of Boston MA in January 2014; a founding member of TransFaith’s National Council, steering committee member of TransEpiscopal, and former board member of Congregation Am Tikva. Mycroft is called to work for social justice at the intersections of faith, LGBTQI+ and fat communities, and is a writer and artist. Zie is partnered with Julia McCrossin, the mas(s)culine fatshion blogger, and they co-parent a dogter.

Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | My artwork (stationery, jewelry & more)

Friday, April 29, 2011

Join The Impact MA – 2nd annual [LGBTQ] Equal Rights Con – “Momentum” - this weekend

Join The Impact Massachusetts’ second annual [LGBTQ] Equal Rights Conference, “Momentum (Our History, Our Movement, Our Future)”, is this weekend, today through Sunday, here in Boston. I’ll be on the panel “Lives Of Faith, Lives Of Activism” – my colleague Rev. Cameron Partridge was invited but unavailable and very kindly recommended me.

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION:

Lives of Faith, Lives of Activism - a panel discussion
Many LGBTQ people continue to worship in faith communities and serve as religious leaders - in spite of negative experiences they may have had with churches or temples in the past - and to experience a faith-centered commitment to seeking justice and equality. What role can faith communities play in advancing LGBTQ rights as an issue of social justice? How do we as LGBTQ people of faith respond to the religious right's anti-gay misinformation and rhetoric? In this interactive and wide-ranging panel discussion, a diverse group of religious leaders, professors, and students will explore these questions and discuss ways in which religious faith shapes our lives and informs our work for equality. Confirmed panelists include minister, writer, and activist Rev. Irene Monroe; historian and professor Jennifer Wright Knust of Boston University Theological School; Delfin Bautista, program coordinator of Unitarian Universalist Association's LGBT Ministries; Nathaniel Katz, Epps Fellow for Undergraduate Ministry at The Memorial Church, Harvard University; and Mycroft Masada Holmes, Chair of the Interfaith Coalition for Transgender Equality.

MY BIO:

Mycroft Masada Holmes is a transgender leader specializing in faith, religion and spirituality. Mycroft is Chair of the Interfaith Coalition for Transgender Equality (ICTE) and Chair of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition’s (MTPC) Training Committee, as well as Emeritus Founding Chair of Keshet’s Transgender Working Group (TWiG) and a board member of Congregation Am Tikva. Mycroft was a member of an Episcopal church which closed, and has been “church shopping”. Mycroft is also committed to working for fat / size acceptance.

FRONT PAGE OF THE CON SITE (http://www.lgbtqmomentum.org/):

2nd ANNUAL EQUAL RIGHTS CONFERENCE
Old South Church at Copley Square
Boston, Massachusetts
April 29th - May 1st

Big thanks to TraniWreck for hosting our opening social event on Friday, April 29th! Join us for an all ages, all gender, all genre, cabaret variety show produced by Truth Serum Productions. Drag, Burlesque, Spoken Word and live music! With special appearances and greetings by Sue Hyde, Gunner Scott, and Robbie Samuels. Doors open at 7pm at Old South Church.
$8 or $10 (more if you have it) - pay at the door cash or check only.

Since 2008 the LGBTQ community has seen real legal and legislative gains, but at the same time many social programs serving the LGBTQ community are facing devastating budget cuts. Just in the last year at the federal level, some of the gains of our movement include: the congressional repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell; the public declaration by the courts and Obama that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, and the granting of transgender non-discrimination protections for HUD funded housing. On a local level, we have taken huge steps forward by winning protections for transgender state employees and anti-bullying legislation, while working to maintain and extend marriage equality in the region. All of these gains are just a step in the right direction, but the fight for full equality and unconditional justice continues and many people in our movement are working on projects that cannnot be measured by legal and legislative gains. This conference will bring together LGBTQ people & allies from all around the Northeast to collaborate and strategize about how to continue our momentum.

SIGN-UP FOR CONFERENCE UPDATES:

To sign up for our email listserv: http://groups.google.com/group/lgbtconference

Follow us on Twitter @lgbtqmomentum or tweet about the conference using
#lgbtqmomentum

Let us know you are attending and share this event on facebook:



Thursday, April 28, 2011

CONNECTICUT Equality Day is TODAY!


GLADbanner

Dear Mycroft,

Equality Day 2011 is this Thursday, April 28! Equality Day is your opportunity to hear exciting guest speakers from the transgender community - like GLAD's Transgender Rights Project Director Jennifer Levi -- and to meet other advocates and citizen activistsworking to pass HB 6599, a bill that would prevent discrimination against transgender people in Connecticut.

RSVP NOW for Equality Day on Thursday, April 28, in the Old Judiciary Room at the State Capitol in Hartford from

10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Our partner organization ctEQUALITY will hold a mini-training on how to discuss the bill with your legislators, because Equality Day is also an opportunity to talk with lawmakers about the importance of making our state a place where people are treated fairly and equally regardless of their gender identity or expression. Our opponents are ramping up their efforts to defeat HB 6599, so we must show legislators and the public that we are unified and committed to full equality for all Connecticut residents!

Never spoken to your legislator before? No problem. ctEQUALITY will provide all the materials and resources you need and walk you through the process. They'll even book the appointment for you

Be sure to share the RSVP link with your pro-equality friends and family!

If you have any questions or concerns, or need assistance with any of the above, please e-mail Sally Tamarkin at stamarkin@cwealf.org or call (860) 247-6090 ext. 105. To learn more, check out ctEQUALITY's website at www.ctequality.com.


Thank you,

Gary Buseck signature
Gary Buseck
Acting Executive Director



CT State Capitol

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Monday, April 25, 2011

Interfaith transgender panel - Harvard University Hillel - THIS WEDNESDAY!

There's going to be an interfaith transgender panel at Harvard University's Hillel this Wednesday (April 27th)! I will be one of the panelists, along with my colleagues Rev. Cameron Partridge, Laurie Wolfe, and Jamez Terry. All are welcome!!! (You don't need to be a Harvard affiliate.) Please join us!

Mycroft Masada Holmes is a transgender leader specializing in faith, religion and spirituality. Mycroft is Chair of the Interfaith Coalition for Transgender Equality (ICTE) and Chair of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition’s (MTPC) Training Committee, as well as Emeritus Founding Chair of Keshet’s Transgender Working Group (TWiG) and a board member of Congregation Am Tikva. Mycroft was a member of an Episcopal church which closed, and has been “church shopping”. Mycroft is also committed to working for fat / size acceptance.

Rev. Dr. Cameron Partridge is the Interim Episcopal Chaplain and a Lecturer who has taught courses in WGS and at the Divinity School. Cameron is a transgender man who transitioned at Harvard as a doctoral student in 2002 and was ordained a priest in the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts in 2005. He has for several years contributed to ongoing conversations on LGBT issues in The Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion. As a founding member of the Interfaith Coalition for Transgender Equality, he is also working to bring transgender and trans-supportive people of faith into public conversations, particularly on pending local and national transgender nondiscrimination legislation.

Laurie Wolfe is an activist, educator and speaker on gender and trans issues. She volunteers with Keshet, a Boston-based organization that works for full inclusion of LGBTQ people in Jewish life, and co-chairs their Greater Boston Steering Committee and Trans Working Group (TWiG). She also volunteers with MTPC, the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition, and SpeakOut Boston, the lgbt speakers bureau. Laurie worked most recently as a fundraiser for non-profit organizations. Her spiritual path has led her from Hatha and Bhakti Yoga to Hindu practices and Shamanic teachings. She is in the process of learning more about what being Jewish is about thanks to her Keshet family. Her current spiritual practice combines prayer, meditation, writing and chanting.

Jamez Terry is an MDiv candidate in the Unitarian Universalist tradition at Harvard Divinity School. He is also the founder and organizer of the Tranny Roadshow and has spent the past 6 years bringing trans performance art to communities throughout North America. He is very interested in the intersections of gender identity and religious identity and in bringing trans communities into conversation with communities of faith. He works at the First Parish in Milton and lives in Somerville with his wife and son.

*******

How did you realize you're transgender?

What does transphobia look like?
Trans people can be in the clergy?
How does your religion affect your identity?
What does it feel like to grow up trans?
What does "transgender" really mean, anyway?

Transforming Faith: Experiencing Religion and Gender Identity


Rainbow Interfaith 2.gif

Wondering about gender identity and faith? Come hear transgender speakers of various religions discuss these questions and others. Speakers will talk about their personal experiences being trans people of faith and reflect upon the influences their religions and gender identities have had on their lives. There will be time for an open Q&A, so bring any questions you have!

When: Wednesday, April 27th, 6-7 pm
Where: Smith Hall, Harvard Hillel
52 Mt. Auburn St.

RSVP on facebook


Co-sponsored by the Progressive Jewish Alliance, BAGELS, Interfaith Council, Harvard College QSA, Trans Task Force, Harvard Secular Society, Harvard Buddhist Community, and other campus religious groups TBA.

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

"Transgender Health and Human Rights" event at Harvard School of Public Health TOMORROW

Facebook event:

The members of the Queer Student Alliance and Women, Gender and Health from Harvard School of Public Health (with the support of The Office of Diversity, HMS Kinsey 2-6ers, and Center for Population Research in LGBT Health at The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health) would like to invite you to the major event in our Spring Speaker Series for 2011!

What: Transgender Health and Human Rights: An evening of thought
provoking speakers, panel discussion, and food
When: Wednesday, April 20th
Time: 5:30pm - 8:00pm - (a hot dinner will be served from 5:15pm)
Where: Kresge Building (G3) - Harvard School of Public Health, 677
Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (map attached)
After: Social event to be arranged in the Longwood area following the event

Our speakers:
• Pauline Park, PhD – New York based transgender rights activist
• Kerith Conron, ScD, MPH – health disparities researcher from
the Institute on Urban Health Research, Northeastern University

A dynamic panel features:
• Norman Spack, MD from the Gender Management Service from
Boston Children’s Hospital
• Ruben Hopwood, MDiv, PhD candidate, Coordinator of the
Transgender Health Program at Fenway Health
• Gunner Scott, Executive Director, Massachusetts Transgender
Political Coalition (MTPC)

Popular & American Culture Associations conference begins today

My partner Julia McCrossin and her colleague Lesleigh Owen co-chair the Fat Studies area of the Popular & American Culture Associations, and have done so for the last few years. They're attending the annual national PCA / ACA conference, which begins today and continues through Saturday; this year it's in San Antonio, Texas. Nesia tova (bon voyage), mazel tov and thank you, Julia and Lesleigh! May you have a wonderful week.

Fat Studies area CFP (call for papers):

Conference website:

Fat Studies presentations:

9127 Fat Identities and Embodiment: RC-Salon K, 3 PM, 4/20/2011
9128 Fatness in Politics and the Academy: RC-Salon K, 4:45 PM, 4/20/2011
9129 Representations of Fat in Popular Culture: RC-Salon K, 11:30 AM, 4/21/2011
9130 “Fat” Gets Defined and Reworked in the Public Sphere: RC-Salon K, 8 AM,
4/22/2011
9131 Bodies Writ Large: Size Politics in Media: RC-Salon K, 1:15 PM, 4/20/2011
9132 Marking Bodies: Fatness and Race/Ethnicity: RC-Salon K, 8 AM, 4/21/2011
9133 Roundtable: How Do We Start Talking and Teaching about Fat Studies in the Academic World?: Sharing Anti-Fat Ignorance and Bigotry Strategies in the
Classroom: RC-Salon K, 8:15 PM, 4/21/2011
9134 Documentary: The Fat Body (In)visible: RC-Salon G, 8:15 PM, 4/20/2011
9135 One Size Does NOT Fit All: Size Acceptance using an Expressive Arts
Therapeutic Approach: RC-Salon K, 9:45 AM, 4/21/2011

9127 -- Fat Identities and Embodiment
Session Chair: Lesleigh Owen, Chaffey College
Fat Orientations: Size, Space, and Sexuality
Jackie Wykes, University of Melbourne
Fat Beauty and the Studio Nude
Leah Sweet
Fighting Fat: Phat Politics and Feminist Identity
Portia Barker, University of Maryland, College Park
Living the Fat Body: Embodiment through Poetry
Lesleigh Owen, Chaffey College

9128 -- Fatness in Politics and the Academy
Session Chair: Hannele Harjunen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Fatness and the Construction of Neoliberal Bodies
Hannele Harjunen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Health at Every Size and the Body Image / Eating Relationship: Policy
Implications
Laura Jennings, University of South Carolina Upstate
Using Storytelling Pedagogies to Combat Weight Bias in Adult Learners
Heather Brown, Northern Illinois University/Lake Forest College

9129 -- Representations of Fat in Popular Culture
Session Chair: Julia McCrossin, George Washington University
‘Bitchcraft’ – The Art of Manipulating Public Opinion through Numerous
Complaints against Marginalized Groups and How it is Now Being Used to Blame
the Fatties
Mary Stein, University of Akron
Never Trust a Skinny Chef: The Proof is in the Fat Body
Benjamin Morton, University of Iowa
Representations of Bodily and Sexual Excess in Huge and Mike & Molly
Kaitlin Clinnin, Virginia Tech
Starvation is Jewish History, Fat is a Jewish Issue
Susan Koppelman, Independent scholar

9130 -- Fat Gets Defined and Reworked in the Public Sphere
Session Chair: Jay Solomon, More of Me to Love
Challenging Sizeism-Based Marginalization: Reactive and Proactive Resistance
Strategies and How to Build a Bridge between Them
Anna Puhakka, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Obesing: The Creation of an Unhealthy Behavior
Jay Solomon, More of Me to Love
The FATSO Model: A Conceptualization of Weight Bias and Fat Acceptance
Peter Jaberg, Forest Institute
Jenny Copeland, Forest Institute
Toward an Articulation of Fat Culture in America
Margitte Kristjansson, University of California at San Diego

9131 -- Bodies Writ Large: Size Politics in Media
Session Chair: Lesleigh Owen, Chaffey College
Beyond Blubber and Fat Camps: Fat Characters as Heroes, Heroines, Romantic
Leads, and Winners in Contemporary Young Adult Fiction
Angie Manfredi, Head of Youth Services, Los Alamos County Library System
Reshaping the (M)other: Feederism in Fiction
Jocelyn Eighan
Big Fat Zero: Performing Absence Online
Kristina Gordon, University of Iowa
The Out of Body Experience of Thinness: Size-ism in Drop Dead Diva
Elka Stevens, Howard University

9132 -- Marking Bodies: Fatness and Race/Ethnicity
Session Chair: Susan Koppelman, Independent scholar
Kelligrl, the Myth, the Legend
Julia McCrossin, George Washington University
Are You Calling Me Fat?: Fatness Through a Disability Studies Lens
Ashley Fullbrook, University of Toronto
Critical Fat Studies and Black Studies at the Crossroads: Race, Respectability, and the (Intra)Politics of "Obesity”
Amanda Gilliam, Columbia University
Latino Masculinities and Fatness
Miguel Juarez, University of Texas at El Paso

9133 -- How Do We Start Talking and Teaching about Fat Studies in the Academic World?: Sharing Anti-Fat Ignorance and Bigotry Strategies in the Classroom
Session Chair: Susan Koppelman, Independent scholar
Miguel Juarez, University of Texas at El Paso
Susan Koppelman, Independent scholar
Heather Brown, Northern Illinois University/Lake Forest College
Virginia Bemis, Ashland University
Jacqueline Johnson, George Washington University

9134 -- Documentary: The Fat Body (In)visible
Session Chair: Margitte Kristjansson, University of California at San Diego
The Fat Body (In)visible
Margitte Kristjansson, University of California at San Diego

9135 -- One Size Does NOT Fit All: Size Acceptance using an Expressive Arts Therapeutic Approach
Session Chair: Deah Schwartz, Co-Founder, Education Through Therapeutic Arts (ETTA)

Thursday, April 14, 2011

BAGLY's 31st Anniversary Celebration is TONIGHT

BAGLY's 31st Anniversary Celebration is TONIGHT, and I wish I was there instead of home sick again (it's just a cold, though). I usually attend this event, and donate my artwork to its silent auction. I was a youth member and leader from 1993 to 1999 (ages 17 to 23), and have been a board member and a staff member (Office Manager).

The Boston Alliance of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth (BAGLY) is a youth-led, adult-supported social support organization committed to social justice, and creating, sustaining and advocating for programs, policies and services for the GLBT youth community. BAGLY also provides weekly and monthly social activities and special events for youth ages 22 and under. These activities provide an opportunity for young people to socialize, have fun and develop a sense of personal and community identity. Now celebrating its 31st anniversary year, BAGLY is the oldest and largest organization specifically for LGBT youth in Massachusetts, and has served over 30,000 youth since its founding.

Event sites (BAGLY's website, bagly.org, is being renovated):

Last email invite:

new bagly logo

BAGLY's 31st Anniversary Celebration!


DONATE

BAGLY is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.
Your gift is tax-deductible as allowed by law.

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Just 8 days left until

BAGLY's 31st Anniversary Celebration

and Auction!

In just 8 short days, BAGLY will be throwing it's 31st Anniversary Celebration! Please join us as we celebrate over three decades of queer youth movement at one of Boston's most anticipated cocktail party fundraisers. Enjoy complimentary hors d'oeuvres and an open wine/beer bar as you browse our silent auction, honor the amazing work of Beth Leventhal and The Network/La Red with our Distinguished Leadership Award and simply have fun at one of Boston's premier party venues, the Artists for Humanity Epicenter.

This event is about celebrating BAGLY's amazing work, the youth that we support and generally having fun in a wonderful celebratory setting. Reserve or buy tickets today. You simply can't miss Boston's BEST party of the spring!

WHEN: Thursday, April 14th, 2011, 6-8 pm.

WHERE: Artists For Humanity Epicenter 100 West Second Street, South Boston, MA.

TICKETS: $100 per person. Call (617) 227-4313 to reserve or reserve and buy tickets online here.

If you are unable to attend but still want to support BAGLY, or want to help support BAGLY alum attend the event, pleaseclick here.

Please note this event is 21+

Click here to check out the Facebook Event Page and see which of your friends are attending.

---------------------

This year we are honoring Beth Leventhal, Exectutive Director and The Network/La Red with our Michael Pumphret Distinguished Leadership Award. Read more about their wonderful work below.

The Network/La Red

The Network/La Red was founded in 1990, and is a survivor-led, social justice organization that works to end partner abuse in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, BDSM, polyamorous, and queer communities. Rooted in anti-oppression principles, our work aims to create a world where all people are free from oppression. We strengthen our communities through organizing, education, and the provision of support services including hotline, safe home, support group, and advocacy. The Network La Red understands oppression to be an imbalance of power intrinsically linked to the privileges bestowed on some at the expense of others, based on but not limited to: race, ethnicity, gender expression and identity, class, ability, sexuality, religion, citizenship status, age, language capacity and history of incarceration and court involvement. Partner abuse exists to achieve and maintain control, and reflects and perpetuates the larger violent culture, which condones and rewards interpersonal, institutional and imperialist abuse of power in order to control and/or exploit groups of people. The Network/La Red links domestic violence to all other forms of violence, oppression and abuse, because the values and tactics behind each are identical. The Network/La Red defines anti-oppression as the beliefs, actions, and policies that aim to eliminate the imbalance of power within our society.

Please take a moment to forward this information to friends, family and colleagues who may support BAGLY's programming for GLBT youth. Thank you!
ABOUT BAGLY
Boston Alliance of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth (BAGLY) is a youth-led, adult-supported social support organization committed to social justice, and creating, sustaining and advocating for programs, policies and services for the GLBT youth community. BAGLY also provides weekly and monthly social activities and special events for youth ages 22 and under. These activities provide an opportunity for young people to socialize, have fun and develop a sense of personal and community identity. Now celebrating its 31st anniversary year, BAGLY is the oldest and largest organization specifically for LGBT youth in Massachusetts, and has served over 30,000 youth since its founding.

QUEER. YOUTH. MOVEMENT


Tuesday, April 12, 2011

The Network / La Red's "Paint The Town (La) Red" event is TONIGHT

The Network / La Red's "Paint The Town (La) Red" event is TONIGHT, and I oh so wish I were there instead of home sick (it's just a cold, though); especially if my Julia could be my date. I've been a supporter and client of The Network for several years; it's a wonderful and all too small and rare organization. Founded in 1989, The Network works to end abuse in lesbian, gay bisexual, transgender, SM and polyamorous communities. Especially partner abuse, including what's most commonly called "domestic violence". Another way to support them is by donating your old cell phones: http://www.thenetworklared.org/cellphone.htm.

Friday, April 8, 2011

MTPC's "I AM : Trans People Speak" -- 3 new video stories, all Jewish

MTPC has added three new video stories to their "I AM : Trans People Speak" public education campaign (http://www.transpeoplespeak.org/). And because this week is Transgender Faith Action Week, all three stories are faith themed -- all three people are Jewish.

Here is MTPC's press release --

Contact Gunner Scott
617-778-0519
gscott@masstpc.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New Videos Highlight Transgender People and Allies Speaking About the Role of Faith in Their Lives

Boston, MA [04.08.11]— The Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition (MTPC) is excited to announce the release of three new videos as part of their ground-breaking multi-media public education campaign entitled I AM: Trans People Speak.

In conjunction with the Interfaith Coalition for Transgender Equality’s (ICTE) Faith Action Week (beginning Sunday April 3, 2011), all three new videos share the common theme of spirituality and religion.

One newly premiered video features Stephanie, an undergraduate student who identifies as a writer, poet, and spoken word artist. Stephanie, in her search for a new spirituality, found Judaism and is currently in the process of conversion. She speaks about working with her rabbi on her conversion and the strong sense of community she has found in Reform Judaism. Stephanie talks about her temple community being loving, accepting, and welcoming people who help inform and strengthen who she is.

Another video being premiered is that of Stacey, a parent and software engineer. Having been raised in a religious Jewish household, Stacey says she feels that she shouldn’t have to give up who she is just because of her transition. Although Stacey had a good experience coming out and transitioning at her job, she found that not everyone at her synagogue was accepting. Stacey speaks about how difficult, and often scary, it can be when people do not respect your identity.

The last new video to premier on the I AM: Trans People Speak website is of David, an ally to the transgender community. David speaks about how is own identity as a gay male intertwines with his Jewish identity—as well as how the two communities intersect. David speaks about being aware of the privilege he has and how he uses that privilege to be a better ally to the trans community. He shares with us his five tips for being a better ally, and details how he, along with Keshet (a national organization that works for the full inclusion of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender Jews in Jewish life) work to welcome back people who feel like they can’t go back to their religious home.

The stories of these three individuals serve to remind that transgender people, like all people, are more than just their gender identity and expression. Transgender people, like all people, belong to a wide variety of individuals and intersecting communities.

I AM is a collection of recorded stories that aims to challenge stereotypes and misconceptions of transgender individuals by highlighting the realities of their lived experience. These voices span across a diversity of communities and intersecting identities. I AM fosters support and raises awareness for trans communities by providing a forum where these unique stories can be shared and given significance.

All three new videos were filmed and edited by Jesse Begenyi, a Boston filmmaker. Begenyi and MTPC plan to continue filming and uploading new videos to the website periodically.

For more information please visit www.transpeoplespeak.org or direct questions to info@transpeoplespeak.org.

For more information about ICTE’s Faith Action Week, please visit www.interfaithcoalition.blogspot.com.

###

About MTPC: Founded in 2001, the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition (MTPC) is dedicated to ending discrimination on the basis of gender identity and gender expression. MTPC works for a world where persons of all genders are treated with respect and fully participate in all areas of society, free from fear of prohibition, harassment or violence based on their gender identity and/or expression. Its members educate the public, advocate with state, local, and federal government, engage in political activism, and encourage empowerment of community members through collective action.

A Night To Remember Stephanie Edwards is TOMORROW

Stephanie Lynne Edwards passed away on Saturday December 18th.
She was a member of Tiffany Club of New England, the Massachusetts Imperial Court, Congregation Am Tikva, and Keshet. She served on TCNE’s board of directors, MTPC’s Steering Committee, and the Randolph Town Meeting (there’s a Patriot Ledger
article about that from 2007); she was also part of the Randolph Country Club
community. If you know her other name, you can find her obituary. She was also
memorialized at Tiffany Club’s annual First Event conference in January.

I knew her through the Jewish and transgender communities, primarily at CAT, Keshet
and MTPC. May her memory be a blessing (as we say in Judaism).

Daphne Prideaux and Genesis of Randolph Country Club have organized a tribute event for Stephanie tomorrow, which is also a benefit for MTPC. I will be attending with two fellow MTPC Steering Committee members, and we’ll be giving a brief speech.
All are welcome – but all guests must be 21+.

A Night to Remember Stephanie Edwards
TOMORROW, Saturday, April 9th, 2011
10:00 p.m. – 1:00 a.m. (Sunday)
Recommended arrival – 9:00 p.m.

Randolph Country Club
44 Mazzeo Drive
Randolph, MA 02368

All guests must be 21+.

$5 donation at door and raffle tickets for donated prizes all benefit the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition (MTPC)! There will also be giveaways, and performers from RCC and the Imperial Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Tiffany Club website page:

Facebook event: