Mycroft Masada is a faith leader who moved to the Washington DC area from hir lifelong home of Boston MA in January 2014; a founding member of TransFaith’s National Council, steering committee member of TransEpiscopal, and former board member of Congregation Am Tikva. Mycroft is called to work for social justice at the intersections of faith, LGBTQI+ and fat communities, and is a writer and artist. Zie is partnered with Julia McCrossin, the mas(s)culine fatshion blogger, and they co-parent a dogter.

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Saturday, December 10, 2016

DMV Fat-Friendly Community holiday party 2016

The DMV Fat-Friendly Community holiday party was today, and it was great, greatly thanks to our hostesses with the most. A smorgasbord of sweet and savory snacks (provided and potluck), clothing swap (complete with shoes, socks, accessories, jewelry…), “white narwhal” gift swap* (based on your favorite holiday movie), and more.

*Pictured is the gift we brought – a stationery set I made to look like sushi-to-go (more of my art at http://masadarts.blogspot.com/2014/12/mycroft-masada-masadarts-my-artwork.html).

This is the group my partner Julia founded a few years ago; it has over 100 members, and the more the merrier.

#DMV #fatfriendly #community #fatcommunity #DC #MD #VA #holidayparty #party #potluck #clothingswap #giftswap #whitenarwhal #fatacceptance #fatjustice #fatactivism

Saturday, December 3, 2016

TransFaith Being Brave Together retreats -- #4 in Baltimore

TransFaith -- where I'm a founding member of the new National Council -- launched its Being Brave Together model early this year, and the centerpiece is our Being Brave Together retreats for trans* and allied spiritual/cultural workers in regions around the country.  We’ve done them in Miami once (February) and Philly twice (April and June), and I’ve co-facilitated all three.  
Our fourth and latest BBT retreat was today in Baltimore, at the GLCCB (GLBT Community Center), and it was good! Thanks, everyone!! I co-facilitated with Vann Millhouse, in partnership with the TF staff and a local planning committee; as usual, we had some other TF leadership with us as well.

But what IS Being Brave Together, you ask? What is in the binder, and the TF carrying case? And what are the river rocks and glass pebbles for? Well, maybe you should come to a BBT retreat and find out.

We are planning them in several places as we speak – including two in my home state of MA -- and want to plan more, so be in touch and stay tuned (transfaithonline.org/connect/being_brave_together/).

#TransFaith #BeingBraveTogether #retreat #trans* #transgender #faith #Baltimore #GLCCB #DMV

Monday, November 28, 2016

Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire -- 74th anniversary (1942 - 2016)

Tonight is the 74th yahrzeit of my paternal grandparents and great aunt – they died on November 28th of 1942, in the fire in Boston’s Cocoanut Grove nightclub, which killed almost 500 people (and injured more than 160 others); may their memories be a blessing.

When my father's parents Adelaide (Levin) and Theodore Wasserman (pictured, probably on their honeymoon in Bermuda) and her sister Sadie (Levin) Levin (yes, she was a Levin who married a Levin!) passed on, they were significantly younger than their youngest grandchild my brother is now; their son my father was two, and his brothers were in infancy and seven. My great-uncle Benjamin Levin, Sadie's husband, survived.

Another of Adelaide's sisters, Lillian, and her husband, came down with the family party from Maine, but as usual that couple opted to go to the Symphony instead.  They began to find out about the fire after they left the Hall and saw all the emergency vehicles.  They adopted their nephews, my father and his brothers.

And I do believe that this is a social in/justice story -- though I also believe that all stories are – especially as the fire was so much the result of corruption within and between the club ownership and the city, and the deaths and injuries largely due to the club’s furnishings becoming extremely toxic when heated.

And I think that that is the primary reason why there has been so much silence around the Grove.  And as usual, even with the positive changes that resulted, the corruption and silence has led to the forgetting and thus repetition of history -- for instance, the Station nightclub fire in Rhode Island.  However, the 70th anniversary of the Grove fire has inspired more acknowledgement and even some action, including the formation of the Cocoanut Grove Coalition -- though I'm not sure how active they've continued to be.

In 2013, there was an official ceremony and reception at the site, and I attended with my father; it included the unveiling of a street sign saying “Cocoanut Grove Lane”, which joined a plaque in the sidewalk that took many years to install and had long been the only marker.

In January 2014, I moved to Maryland after a lifetime in the Boston area, to begin living with my partner of what was then four and half years, Julia (she has always lived in MD or DC, and needed to remain here to care for her parents).  I have been missing my usual annual visit(s) to the Grove site, where I would leave flowers and/or other small gifts.  My father has continued the visits, and was there this afternoon, though he saw no sign of other visitors.  Here are his photos of the plaque and its context today (rather conveniently, he is a professional photographer).  

And I am sorry to hear that luxury condos have been built on the site -- and how much more so that their management, some tenants and others have added insult to injury by complaining about having to remember the Grove fire, and managed to remove the plaque and move it down the street.  But, I am glad to hear that this drama prompted the mayor to announce that he supports the installation of a full-on memorial.

And speaking of drama, there is a new play about the Grove fire -- James Hansen Prince's "Inferno : Fire At The Cocoanut Grove 1942" (Prince, who both wrote and directed, had a relative at the Grove that night); I have heard some good things, and hope to at least read it soon.  Too, I will continue to work on a fuller piece about this part of our family’s story -- though I think a truly full version may need to wait until after more people pass away.

Saturday, November 26, 2016

My Aunt Pat, a professional artist in Boston, gives art lessons


One of my maternal aunts is Patricia Trapp, a professional artist back in Boston. She offers art lessons, prints and stationery of her photography (of her flowers, rainbows from her sun-catchers, and other things) as well as other crafts (including hand-painted eggs), and takes commissions for paintings and possibly other artwork.  I help her with her PR, especially because she's not online at all; this is her permanent ad, and a new one goes up on CraigsList (Boston) each week.  My artwork is here (and via the "My artwork" link in this blog's header).

Patricia Trapp, a professional artist in Boston, is offering art classes for individuals and small groups of all ages. She is also available for freelance mural work. She can be reached at 617.522.2046.

Classes include:

- Basic instruction in the fundamentals of painting

- Beginning through advanced techniques

- Brushwork 

- Color, light and shade / shadow, and perspective

- Describing form, how to build a painting

- Illustrating animals, landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes

- Creating natural textures, such as foliage

- How-to's of students' requests

- Ink, watercolor, acrylics and pastels -- no oils

There is a shopping list of basic required materials, which are to be purchased by students. 

Patricia is a native of the Boston area, and has been a professional artist here and in Europe for many years. She is currently a professional freelance muralist, for the decorators of the Boston Design Center and private clients. 

She attended Boston's Museum of Fine Arts' School, and received her BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts) in Theatre Design from Boston University. She was the resident designer and head of the painting department at Decocitel in Brussels, Belgium. She has also been a designer and instructor at the University of Massachusetts / Boston, the Boston Conservatory, and the Boston and Brookline Public Schools (through a grant from the Massachusetts Council for the Arts), and currently teaches art in a Cambridge school. 

Please call her at 617.522.2046.

The above image is one of Patricia's commissioned paintings, done entirely by hand -- the original is 6 feet by 8 feet.  The below is a dragon t-shirt she made for me -- an iron-on transfer of a scan of her original 8”x10” painting, additional iron-on transfers of scans of her original painted framing corners, hand-applied 3D gold glitter t-shirt paint, hand-sewn beads.



Mycroft Masada ~ MasadArts ~ my artwork

These are some of the options for my sushi stationery sets -- little kits for creating offline mail that look like boxes of takeaway sushi.

Shana tova, happy 5777, and welcome to the MasadArts art department.   

I’ve updated my artwork portfolio, and made it into 3 albums: 
  • Stationery (greeting cards in several formats, gift tags / ornaments, keepsake books, sushi stationery sets…) 
  •  Jewelry (earrings, pendants, friendship pins…) 
  • Miscellaneous (wrapped pomegranates and candles, juice bottle cap tea-light holders, eyeglass cases…)
My work is mostly handmade, and made mostly of vintage / recycled / found / thrifted / gifted etc. materials; and I do take commissions, personalize, customize and so on. 

I invite you to enjoy, Like / +1, comment, share, shop, etc.

Also, my Aunt Pat back in Boston is also an artist, and offers lessons, paintings, photography, stationery and more

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Fat Studies Journal call for proposals -- Fatness & Temporality

(I couldn't find a web page for this CFP, so I gave it one here. My "Good News : A Sermon On Fat Justice" appears in the Journal's Religion & Fat special issue of April 2015 (volume 4 issue 2).  : > ))

Special issue of Fat Studies: Fatness and Temporality

Guest edited by Jen Rinaldi, Emma Lind, May Friedman, Crystal Kotow, Tracy Tidgwell

The “Fatness and Temporality” special issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society considers the relationship between fat identity and the social construction of time. The editors invite papers on a variety of topics that explore, for example, how fat bodies interrupt, disrupt, engage, or resist ideas about normative timelines and expectations of the human lifespan. Building upon queer theory’s temporal turn, our interrogation of fat temporalities considers the impacts of affect, sensation, and memory through the lens of fat citizenship. We seek to answer questions such as: what is the fat body’s imagined past and future? How might we theorize fat futurity? How do fat subjects “fall out of time” in their disavowal of normative life scripts?

This special issue invites papers across disciplines that may consider themes such as:

● Fat bodies as sites of metamorphosis and, thus, atemporality;
● Age-specific weight guidelines and the normative construction of the growing adolescent body;
● The exclusion of fat bodies from “youthful” standards of idealized bodies;
● The pressures to lose weight in anticipation of rites of passage like marriage;
● The “perils” of fat as violations of the necessity of long life and prosperity at any cost;
● Fat bodies as retreating to childlike states in terms of both external controls and the imperative to shrink;
● The recursiveness of fat bodies which may yoyo through different states;
● Fat as outside of normative timelines of romance and reproduction and the limitations and opportunities offered by existing outside of these frames;
● Implications for fat reproduction and/or fat parenting as impossible or highly fraught states;
● Fat history and the association of obesity with industrial modernity.

To submit a proposal for inclusion in this special issue of the journal, please send a 250-500 word summary of your article as well as a current CV to Jen Rinaldi, at Jen.Rinaldi@uoit.ca by October 1, 2016. Any questions about the special issue can be directed to this email address as well.

First drafts of full manuscripts will be submitted for editorial review by December 1, 2016. Full final manuscripts will be required in March 31, 2017. Final submissions should be between 3,000 and 6,000 words, including all notes and references. If you wish to include reproductions of visual images with your essay, you will need to receive permission to do so from the artists/ copyright holders of the image(s). All authors will need to sign a form that transfers copyright of their article to the publisher, Taylor & Francis / Routledge.

Fat Studies is the first academic journal in the field of scholarship that critically examines theory, research, practices, and programs related to body weight and appearance. Content includes original research and overviews exploring the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. Articles critically examine representations of fat in health and medical sciences, the Health at Every Size model, the pharmaceutical industry, psychology, sociology, cultural studies, legal issues, literature, pedagogy, art, theater, popular culture, media studies, and activism.

Fat Studies is an interdisciplinary, international field of scholarship that critically examines societal attitudes and practices about body weight and appearance. Fat Studies advocates equality for all people regardless of body size. It explores the way fat people are oppressed, the reasons why, who benefits from that oppression and how to liberate fat people from oppression. Fat Studies seeks to challenge and remove the negative associations that society has about fat and the fat body. It regards weight, like height, as a human characteristic that varies widely across any population. Fat Studies is similar to academic disciplines that focus on race, ethnicity, gender, or age.

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Maryland Trans* Unity Picnic 2016


After taking a break last year, today’s 3rd (Mostly) Annual Maryland Trans*Unity Picnic at Open Door Metropolitan Community Church (a beautiful building in beautiful grounds) was very good indeed. 

Thank you, everyone!!! Very special thanks to MD Trans* Unity organizer Ezra Towne and family, who among other things provided this amazing cake -- which not only includes the trans* flag but colors from genderqueer and other community flags!

(And the bakery left out the asterisk, so I made one using a Sharpie on the back of a glass pebble.)

Good fellowship, good food, good games and sidewalk chalk, and good news -- we are finally starting a queer community center for our county (!) -- the MoCo Pride Center.



And a good way to spend my mother's 16th yahrzeit (she passed on 16 years ago today, primarily due to alcoholism).

#MDTransUnity #MarylandTransUnity #picnic #potluck #OpenDoorMCC #BoydsMD #Boyds #MD #Maryland #trans* #transgender #DC #Washington #WashingtonDC #Baltimore #MoCoMD #MontgomeryCountyMD #MontgomeryCounty

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Montgomery County MD Police Department LGBTQ Community Meeting

Though it was only announced last Wednesday, and we and many others only heard about it yesterday (or today), tonight’s Montgomery County Police Department LGBTQ Community Meeting was pleasantly surprising, and a first in many ways, including the first in a series -- the next one is scheduled for September 21st, and the contact person is Lt. Nick Augustine at Nicholas.Augustine@MontgomeryCountyMD.gov (a gay officer who spoke first and MCed).

It was already in the works when the Pulse shooting occurred, and it also turns out that even in our highly unusual "model" county, anti-LGBTQ incidents are the most likely.

I was interviewed by Montgomery Community Media (also includes Stephanie Kreps' interview; they published a separate video with Chief Manger's interview), WUSA 9 and WTOP (at the same time, but we haven't found the latter's story yet, though at least one person heard it on the radio), and included in NBC Washington’s report; my partner Julia's question to the chief about the needs of LGBTQ people of color was made good use of as well.  The Montgomery Sentinel was there but we haven't found their story yet either.

‪#‎Orlandoshooting‬ ‪#‎Pulseshooting‬ ‪#‎Orlando‬ ‪#‎Pulse‬ ‪#‎MontgomeryCountyMD‬ ‪#‎MoCoMD‬ ‪#‎MoCo‬ ‪#‎MoCoMDPolice‬ ‪#‎MCMDPublicSafety‬ ‪#‎Gaithersburg‬ ‪#‎MD‬ ‪#‎Maryland‬ ‪#‎LGBTQLatinx‬ ‪#‎LGBTQPOC‬ ‪#‎Latinx‬ ‪#‎POC‬ ‪#‎LGBTQ‬ ‪#‎PrideMonth2016‬ ‪#‎Pride2016‬ ‪#‎PrideMonth‬ ‪#‎Pride‬ ‪#‎police‬